Graph Convolutional Neural Network (Part II)

In the previous post, the convolution of the graph Laplacian is defined in its graph Fourier space as outlined in the paper of Bruna et. al. (arXiv:1312.6203) However, the eigenmodes of the graph Laplacian are not ideal because it makes the bases to be graph-dependent. A lot of works were done in order to solve this problem, with the help of various special functions to express the filter functions. Examples include Chebyshev polynomials and Cayley transform.

ChebNet

Kipf and Welling proposed the ChebNet (arXiv:1609.02907) to approximate the filter using Chebyshev polynomial, using the result proved by Hammond et. al. (arXiv:0912.3848) With a convolutional layer g_{\theta} \circ x, instead of computing it directly by \Phi^T g_{\theta} \Phi x, it approximates the filter in terms of Chebyshev polynomial:

g_{\theta} (\Lambda) \approx \sum_{k=0}^K \theta_k T_k(\Lambda),

where T_k(x) are the Chebyshev polynomials. It has been proved by Hammond et. al. that by well truncating this representation, Chebyshev polynomials are very good to approximate the function. Then the convolution is:

g_{\theta} \circ x \approx \sum_{k=0}^K \theta_k T_k (\Lambda) x.

Here, \theta’s are the parameters to be trained. This fixed the bases of the representation, and it speeds up computation. The disadvantage is that eigenvalues are clusters in a few values with large gaps.

CayleyNet

The problem of ChebNet led to the work of Levie et. al., (arXiv:1705.07664) who proposed another approximation is used using Cayley transform. They made use of the Cayley function:

C(\lambda) = \frac{\lambda - i}{\lambda + i},

which is a bijective function from \mathbb{R}^+ to complex unit half-circle. Instead of Chebyshev polynomials, it approximates the filter as:

g(\lambda) = c_0 + \sum_{j=1}^r \left[ c_j C^j (h \lambda) + c_j^{\ast} C^{j \ast} (h \lambda) \right] ,

where c_0 is real and other c_j’s are generally complex, and h is a zoom parameter, and \lambda’s are the eigenvalues of the graph Laplacian. Tuning $h$ makes one find the best zoom that spread the top eigenvalues. c‘s are computed by training. This solves the problem of unfavorable clusters in ChebNet.

MotifNet

All previous works are undirected graph. How do we deal with directed graph with an asymmetric graph Laplacian? Benson, Gleich, Leskovec published an important work on Science in 2016 (arXiv:1612.08447) to address this problem. Their approach is reducing a directed graph to a higher order structure called network motifs. There are 13 network motifs. For each network motif, one can define an adjacency matrix for that motif by \mathcal{M}_k, with elements \mathcal{M}_{k, ij} being the number of motifs in the graph the the edge (i, j) that it belongs to.

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Then one computes 13 graph Laplacians from these 13 adjacency matrices. These graph Laplacians are symmetric, like those of undirected graphs. Then any filters can be approximated by the following multivariate matrix polynomial, as suggested by Monti, Otness, and Bronstein in their MotifNet paper (arXiv:1802.01572):

f_{\Theta} (\Delta_1, \dots, \Delta_k) = \sum_{j=0}^P \sum_{k_1, \dots, k_j \in {1, \ldots, K}} \theta_{\theta_1, \ldots, \theta_k} \Delta_{k_1}, \ldots, \Delta_{k_j} .

Applications of image processing, citation networks etc.

Continue reading “Graph Convolutional Neural Network (Part II)”

Capsules: Alternative to Pooling

Recently, Geoffrey Hinton and his colleagues made the article about capsules available. He has been known to heavily criticize the use of pooling and back propagation.

“A capsule is a group of neurons whose activity vector represents the instantiation parameters of a specific type of entity such as an object or object part.” The nodes of inputs and outputs are vectors, instead of scalars as in neural networks. A cheat sheet comparing the traditional neurons and capsules is as follow:

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Based on the capsule, the authors suggested a new type of layer called CapsNet.

Huadong Liao implemented CapsNet with TensorFlow according to the paper. (Refer to his repository.)

Continue reading “Capsules: Alternative to Pooling”

ConvNet Seq2seq for Machine Translation

In these few days, Facebook published a new research paper, regarding the use of sequence to sequence (seq2seq) model for machine translation. What is special about this seq2seq model is that it uses convolutional neural networks (ConvNet, or CNN), instead of recurrent neural networks (RNN).

The original seq2seq model is implemented with Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM) model, published by Google.(see their paper) It is basically a character-based model that generates texts according to a sequence of input characters. And the same author constructed a neural conversational model, (see their paper) as mentioned in a previous blog post. Daewoo Chong, from Booz Allen Hamilton, presented its implementation using Tensorflow in DC Data Education Meetup on April 13, 2017. Johns Hopkins also published a spell correction algorithm implemented in seq2seq. (see their paper) The real advantage of RNN over CNN is that there is no limit about the size of the tokens input or output.

While the fixing of the size of vectors for CNN is obvious, using CNN serves the purpose of limiting the size of input vectors, and thus limiting the size of contexts. This limits the contents, and speeds up the training process. RNN is known to be trained slow. Facebook uses this CNN seq2seq model for their machine translation model. For more details, take a look at their paper and their Github repository.

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Continue reading “ConvNet Seq2seq for Machine Translation”

Release of shorttext 0.3.3

On November 21, 2016, the Python package `shorttext’ was published. Until today, more than seven versions have been published. There have been a drastic architecture change, but the overall purpose is still the same, as summarized in the first introduction entry:

This package `shorttext‘ was designed to tackle all these problems… It contains the following features:

  • example data provided (including subject keywords and NIH RePORT);
  • text preprocessing;
  • pre-trained word-embedding support;
  • gensim topic models (LDA, LSI, Random Projections) and autoencoder;
  • topic model representation supported for supervised learning using scikit-learn;
  • cosine distance classification; and
  • neural network classification (including ConvNet, and C-LSTM).

And since the first version, there have been updates, as summarized in the documention (News):

Version 0.3.3 (Apr 19, 2017)

  • Deleted CNNEmbedVecClassifier.
  • Added script ShortTextWord2VecSimilarity.

Version 0.3.2 (Mar 28, 2017)

  • Bug fixed for gensim model I/O;
  • Console scripts update;
  • Neural networks up to Keras 2 standard (refer to this).

Version 0.3.1 (Mar 14, 2017)

  • Compact model I/O: all models are in single files;
  • Implementation of stacked generalization using logistic regression.

Version 0.2.1 (Feb 23, 2017)

  • Removal attempts of loading GloVe model, as it can be run using gensim script;
  • Confirmed compatibility of the package with tensorflow;
  • Use of spacy for tokenization, instead of nltk;
  • Use of stemming for Porter stemmer, instead of nltk;
  • Removal of nltk dependencies;
  • Simplifying the directory and module structures;
  • Module packages updated.

Although there are still additions that I would love to add, but it would not change the overall architecture. I may add some more supervised learning algorithms, but under the same network. The upcoming big additions will be generative models or seq2seq models, but I do not see them coming in the short term. I will add corpuses.

I may add tutorials if I have time.

I am thankful that there is probably some external collaboration with other Python packages. Some people have already made some useful contributions. It will be updated if more things are confirmed.

Continue reading “Release of shorttext 0.3.3”

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