Interpretability of Neural Networks

The theory and the interpretability of deep neural networks have always been called into questions. In the recent few years, there have been several ideas uncovering the theory of neural networks.

Renormalization Group (RG)

Mehta and Schwab analytically connected renormalization group (RG) with one particular type of deep learning networks, the restricted Boltzmann machines (RBM). (See their paper and a previous post.) RBM is similar to Heisenberg model in statistical physics. This weakness of this work is that it can only explain only one type of deep learning algorithms.

However, this insight gives rise to subsequent work, with the use of density matrix renormalization group (DMRG), entanglement renormalization (in quantum information), and tensor networks, a new supervised learning algorithm was invented. (See their paper and a previous post.)

Neural Networks as Polynomial Approximation

Lin and Tegmark were not satisfied with the RG intuition, and pointed out a special case that RG does not explain. However, they argue that neural networks are good approximation to several polynomial and asymptotic behaviors of the physical universe, making neural networks work so well in predictive analytics. (See their paper, Lin’s reply on Quora, and a previous post.)

Information Bottleneck (IB)

Tishby and his colleagues have been promoting information bottleneck as a backing theory of deep learning. (See previous post.) In recent papers such as arXiv:1612.00410, on top of his information bottleneck, they devised an algorithm using variation inference.

Generalization

Recently, Kawaguchi, Kaelbling, and Bengio suggested that “deep model classes have an exponential advantage to represent certain natural target functions when compared to shallow model classes.” (See their paper and a previous post.) They provided their proof using generalization theory. With this, they introduced a new family of regularization methods.

Geometric View on Generative Adversarial Networks (GAN)

Recently, Lei, Su, Cui, Yau, and Gu tried to offer a geometric view of generative adversarial networks (GAN), and provided a simpler method of training the discriminator and generator with a large class of transportation problems. However, I am still yet to understand their work, and their experimental results were done on low-dimensional feature spaces. (See their paper.) Their work is very mathematical.

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Short Text Mining using Advanced Keras Layers and Maxent: shorttext 0.4.1

On 07/28/2017, shorttext published its release 0.4.1, with a few important updates. To install it, type the following in the OS X / Linux command line:

>>> pip install -U shorttext

The documentation in PythonHosted.org has been abandoned. It has been migrated to readthedocs.org. (URL: http://shorttext.readthedocs.io/ or http:// shorttext.rtfd.io)

Exploiting the Word-Embedding Layer

This update is mainly due to an important update in gensim, motivated by earlier shorttext‘s effort in integrating scikit-learn and keras. And gensim also provides a keras layer, on the same footing as other neural networks, activation function, or dropout layers, for Word2Vec models. Because shorttext has been making use of keras layers for categorization, such advance in gensim in fact makes it a natural step to add an embedding layer of all neural networks provided in shorttext. How to do it? (See shorttext tutorial for “Deep Neural Networks with Word Embedding.”)

import shorttext
wvmodel = shorttext.utils.load_word2vec_model('/path/to/GoogleNews-vectors-negative300.bin.gz')   # load the pre-trained Word2Vec model
trainclassdict = shorttext.data.subjectkeywords()   # load an example data set

 

To train a model, you can do it the old way, or do it the new way with additional gensim function:

kmodel = shorttext.classifiers.frameworks.CNNWordEmbed(wvmodel=wvmodel, nb_labels=len(trainclassdict.keys()), vecsize=100, with_gensim=True)   # keras model, setting with_gensim=True
classifier = shorttext.classifiers.VarNNEmbeddedVecClassifier(wvmodel, with_gensim=True, vecsize=100)   # instantiate the classifier, setting with_gensim=True
classifier.train(trainclassdict, kmodel)

The parameters with_gensim in both CNNWordEmbed and VarNNEmbeddedVecClassifier are set to be False by default, because of backward compatibility. However, setting it to be True will enable it to use the new gensim Word2Vec layer.

These change in gensim and shorttext are the works mainly contributed by Chinmaya Pancholi, a very bright student at Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, and a GSoC (Google Summer of Code) student in 2017. He revolutionized gensim by integrating scikit-learn and keras into gensim. He also used what he did in gensim to improve the pipelines of shorttext. He provided valuable technical suggestions. You can read his GSoC proposal, and his blog posts in RaRe Technologies, Inc. Chinmaya has been diligently mentored by Ivan Menshikh and Lev Konstantinovskiy of RaRe Technologies.

Maxent Classifier

Another important update is the adding of maximum entropy (maxent) classifier. (See the corresponding tutorial on “Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) Classifier.”) I will devote a separate entry on the theory, but it is very easy to use it,

import shorttext
from shorttext.classifiers import MaxEntClassifier

classifier = MaxEntClassifier()

Use the NIHReports dataset as the example:

classdict = shorttext.data.nihreports()
classifier.train(classdict, nb_epochs=1000)

The classification is just like other classifiers provided by shorttext:

classifier.score('cancer immunology') # NCI tops the score
classifier.score('children health') # NIAID tops the score
classifier.score('Alzheimer disease and aging') # NIAID tops the score

Continue reading “Short Text Mining using Advanced Keras Layers and Maxent: shorttext 0.4.1”

NSFW Image Classification

At the end of last month, Yahoo opened the sources of training a model to classify not suitable/safe for work (NSFW) images, particularly pornographic images, using convolutional neural network (CNN). It was implemented with Caffe. Users need to supply the training data, positive being the NSFW images, and negative being the suitable/safe for work (SFW) images, to train the model. The model takes an image as the input, and output a score between 0 and 1.

The codes are available on Github, with the README.md about the installation.

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Relevance and Deep Learning

The descriptive power of deep learning has bothered a lot of scientists and engineers, despite its powerful applications in data cleaning, natural language processing, playing Go, computer vision etc. A while ago, as stated in my previous blog entry, Mehta and Schwab discussed the mathematical equivalence between renormalization group (RG) and restricted Boltzmann machines (RBM), a type of deep learning algorithm. [Mehta & Schwab, 2014] I think it is insightful in a way that in each round of calculation, irrelevant information is filtered out by diminishing the weight. Each step is sort of like an RG step. However, this work has two weaknesses: 1) it is restricted to one specific type of deep learning, i.e., RBM; 2) it does not provide insight of how to choose the hyperparameters. It offers an insightful explanation, but it is not useful.

A few weeks ago, one of my friends introduced to me the work by Tishby and his colleagues. It does not only provide insights to why deep learning works, but also sheds light on how to choose hyperparameters. It makes use of the concept of information bottleneck (IB). Information bottleneck is a technique in information theory that aims at capturing the relevant information in the input variables x so that the output variable y can be most accurately predicted. A technique derived by Tishby, [Tishby & Pereira, 1999] it is proposed to use in choosing the hyperparameters of deep neural networks (DNN). [Tishby & Zalavsky, 2015] The idea is to get a functional, the DNN itself in this context, that captures the most relevant information in x to output y. So instead of coarse-graining information in each step as in RG, the algorithm is to have the most compact form before it was even trained. It is not only insightful, but sounds practical.

But its practicality needs to be tested over time.

Continue reading “Relevance and Deep Learning”

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