ConvNet Seq2seq for Machine Translation

In these few days, Facebook published a new research paper, regarding the use of sequence to sequence (seq2seq) model for machine translation. What is special about this seq2seq model is that it uses convolutional neural networks (ConvNet, or CNN), instead of recurrent neural networks (RNN).

The original seq2seq model is implemented with Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM) model, published by Google.(see their paper) It is basically a character-based model that generates texts according to a sequence of input characters. And the same author constructed a neural conversational model, (see their paper) as mentioned in a previous blog post. Daewoo Chong, from Booz Allen Hamilton, presented its implementation using Tensorflow in DC Data Education Meetup on April 13, 2017. Johns Hopkins also published a spell correction algorithm implemented in seq2seq. (see their paper) The real advantage of RNN over CNN is that there is no limit about the size of the tokens input or output.

While the fixing of the size of vectors for CNN is obvious, using CNN serves the purpose of limiting the size of input vectors, and thus limiting the size of contexts. This limits the contents, and speeds up the training process. RNN is known to be trained slow. Facebook uses this CNN seq2seq model for their machine translation model. For more details, take a look at their paper and their Github repository.

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Python Package for Short Text Mining

There has been a lot of methods for natural language processing and text mining. However, in tweets, surveys, Facebook, or many online data, texts are short, lacking data to build enough information. Traditional bag-of-words (BOW) model gives sparse vector representation.

Semantic relations between words are important, because we usually do not have enough data to capture the similarity between words. We do not want “drive” and “drives,” or “driver” and “chauffeur” to be completely different.

The relation between or order of words become important as well. Or we want to capture the concepts that may be correlated in our training dataset.

We have to represent these texts in a special way and perform supervised learning with traditional machine learning algorithms or deep learning algorithms.

This package `shorttext‘ was designed to tackle all these problems. It is not a completely new invention, but putting everything known together. It contains the following features:

  • example data provided (including subject keywords and NIH RePORT);
  • text preprocessing;
  • pre-trained word-embedding support;
  • gensim topic models (LDA, LSI, Random Projections) and autoencoder;
  • topic model representation supported for supervised learning using scikit-learn;
  • cosine distance classification; and
  • neural network classification (including ConvNet, and C-LSTM).

Readers can refer this to the documentation.

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