Short Text Mining using Advanced Keras Layers and Maxent: shorttext 0.4.1

On 07/28/2017, shorttext published its release 0.4.1, with a few important updates. To install it, type the following in the OS X / Linux command line:

>>> pip install -U shorttext

The documentation in PythonHosted.org has been abandoned. It has been migrated to readthedocs.org. (URL: http://shorttext.readthedocs.io/ or http:// shorttext.rtfd.io)

Exploiting the Word-Embedding Layer

This update is mainly due to an important update in gensim, motivated by earlier shorttext‘s effort in integrating scikit-learn and keras. And gensim also provides a keras layer, on the same footing as other neural networks, activation function, or dropout layers, for Word2Vec models. Because shorttext has been making use of keras layers for categorization, such advance in gensim in fact makes it a natural step to add an embedding layer of all neural networks provided in shorttext. How to do it? (See shorttext tutorial for “Deep Neural Networks with Word Embedding.”)

import shorttext
wvmodel = shorttext.utils.load_word2vec_model('/path/to/GoogleNews-vectors-negative300.bin.gz')   # load the pre-trained Word2Vec model
trainclassdict = shorttext.data.subjectkeywords()   # load an example data set

 

To train a model, you can do it the old way, or do it the new way with additional gensim function:

kmodel = shorttext.classifiers.frameworks.CNNWordEmbed(wvmodel=wvmodel, nb_labels=len(trainclassdict.keys()), vecsize=100, with_gensim=True)   # keras model, setting with_gensim=True
classifier = shorttext.classifiers.VarNNEmbeddedVecClassifier(wvmodel, with_gensim=True, vecsize=100)   # instantiate the classifier, setting with_gensim=True
classifier.train(trainclassdict, kmodel)

The parameters with_gensim in both CNNWordEmbed and VarNNEmbeddedVecClassifier are set to be False by default, because of backward compatibility. However, setting it to be True will enable it to use the new gensim Word2Vec layer.

These change in gensim and shorttext are the works mainly contributed by Chinmaya Pancholi, a very bright student at Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, and a GSoC (Google Summer of Code) student in 2017. He revolutionized gensim by integrating scikit-learn and keras into gensim. He also used what he did in gensim to improve the pipelines of shorttext. He provided valuable technical suggestions. You can read his GSoC proposal, and his blog posts in RaRe Technologies, Inc. Chinmaya has been diligently mentored by Ivan Menshikh and Lev Konstantinovskiy of RaRe Technologies.

Maxent Classifier

Another important update is the adding of maximum entropy (maxent) classifier. (See the corresponding tutorial on “Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) Classifier.”) I will devote a separate entry on the theory, but it is very easy to use it,

import shorttext
from shorttext.classifiers import MaxEntClassifier

classifier = MaxEntClassifier()

Use the NIHReports dataset as the example:

classdict = shorttext.data.nihreports()
classifier.train(classdict, nb_epochs=1000)

The classification is just like other classifiers provided by shorttext:

classifier.score('cancer immunology') # NCI tops the score
classifier.score('children health') # NIAID tops the score
classifier.score('Alzheimer disease and aging') # NIAID tops the score

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SOCcer: Computerized Coding In Epidemiology

There are many tasks that involve coding, for example, putting kids into groups according to their age, labeling the webpages about their kinds, or putting students in Hogwarts into four colleges… And researchers or lawyers need to code people, according to their filled-in information, into occupations. Melissa Friesen, an investigator in Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics (DCEG), National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Institutes of Health (NIH), saw the need of large-scale coding. Many researchers are dealing with big data concerning epidemiology. She led a research project, in collaboration with Office of Intramural Research (OIR), Center for Information Technology (CIT), National Institutes of Health (NIH), to develop an artificial intelligence system to cope with the problem. This leads to a publicly available tool called SOCcer, an acronym for “Standardized Occupation Coding for Computer-assisted Epidemiological Research.” (URL: http://soccer.nci.nih.gov/soccer/)

The system was initially developed in an attempt to find the correlation between the onset of cancers and other diseases and the occupation. “The application is not intended to replace expert coders, but rather to prioritize which job descriptions would benefit most from expert review,” said Friesen in an interview. She mainly works with Daniel Russ in CIT.

SOCcer takes job title, industry codes (in terms of SIC, Standard Industrial Classification), and job duties, and gives an occupational code called SOC 2010 (Standard Occupational Classification), used by U. S. federal government agencies. The data involves short text, often messy. There are 840 codes in SOC 2010 systems. Conventional natural language processing (NLP) methods may not apply. Friesen, Russ, and Kwan-Yuet (Stephen) Ho (also in OIR, CIT; a CSRA staff) use fuzzy logic, and maximum entropy (maxent) methods, with some feature engineering, to build various classifiers. These classifiers are aggregated together, as in stacked generalization (see my previous entry), using logistic regression, to give a final score.

SOCcer has a companion software, called SOCAssign, for expert coders to prioritize the codings. It was awarded with DCEG Informatics Tool Challenge 2015. SOCcer itself was awarded in 2016. And the SOCcer team was awarded for Scientific Award of Merit by CIT/OCIO in 2016 as well (see this). Their work was published in Occup. Environ. Med.

soccer

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Scientific Models in the Computing Era

Rplot_KwanRevenue

In my very first class to introductory college physics, I was told that a good scientific model have a general descriptive power. While it is true, I found that it is a oversimplified statement after I was exposed to computational science and other fields outside physics.

Descriptive power is important, as in Shelling model in economics; but to many scientists and engineers, a model is devised because of its predictive power, which can be seen as one aspect of its descriptive power. Predictive power is a useful feature. All physics and engineering models have predictive power in a quantitative sense.

Physics models have to be descriptive in a sense that the models are describing physical things; but in the big data era, a lot of machine learning models are like black boxes, which means we care only about the meaning of inputs and outputs, but the content of the models do not necessarily carry a meaning. SVM and deep learning are good examples. (This in fact bothers some people.) But of course, in physics, there are a lot of phenomenological models that are between descriptive models and black boxes, such as the Ginzburg-Landau-Wilson (GLW) model widely used in magnets, superfluids, helimagnets, superconductors, liquid crystals etc. However, to be fair, some machine learning models are quite descriptive, such as clustering, Gaussian mixtures, MaxEnt etc.

A lot of traditional physics models are equation-based, but computational models are not. The reasons are evident. And of course, traditional physics models are mostly continuous while computational models are sometimes discrete. If the computational models are continuous and equation-based, they will be translated to discrete version for the computing machines to handle correctly.

However, whichever forms the models take, we, human beings, are essential to give the models meaning so that they are useful.

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Useful Python Packages

python
(Taken from http://latticeqcd.org/pythonorg/static/images/antigravity.png, adapted from http://xkcd.com/353/)

Python is the basic programming languages if one wants to work on data nowadays. Its popularity comes with its intuitive syntax, its support of several programming paradigms, and the package numpy (Numerical Python). Yes, if you asked which package is a “must-have” outside the standard Python packages, I would certainly name numpy.

Let me list some useful packages that I have found useful:

  1. numpy: Numerical Python. Its basic data type is ndarray, which acts like a vector with vectorized calculation support. It makes Python to perform matrix calculation efficiently like MATLAB and Octave. It supports a lot of commonly used linear algebraic algorithms, such as eigenvalue problems, SVD etc. It is the basic of a lot of other Python packages that perform heavy numerical computation. It is such an important package that, in some operating systems, numpy comes with Python as well.
  2. scipy: Scientific Python. It needs numpy, but it supports also sparse matrices, special functions, statistics, numerical integration…
  3. matplotlib: Graph plotting.
  4. scikit-learn: machine learning library. It contains a number of supervised and unsupervised learning algorithms.
  5. nltk: natural language processing. It provides not only basic tools like stemmers, lemmatizers, but also some algorithms like maximum entropy, tf-idf vectorizer etc. It provides a few corpuses, and supports WordNet dictionary.
  6. gensim: another useful natural language processing package with an emphasis on topic modeling. It mainly supports Word2Vec, latent semantic indexing (LSI), and latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA). It is convenient to construct term-document matrices, and convert them to matrices in numpy or scipy.
  7. networkx: a package that supports both undirected and directed graphs. It provides basic algorithms used in graphs.
  8. sympy: Symbolic Python. I am not good at this package, but I know mathics and SageMath are both based on it.
  9. pandas: it supports data frame handling like R. (I have not used this package as I am a heavy R user.)

Of course, if you are a numerical developer, to save you a good life, install Anaconda.

There are some other packages that are useful, such as PyCluster (clustering), xlrd (Excel files read/write), PyGame (writing games)… But since I have not used them, I would rather mention it in this last paragraph, not to endorse but avoid devaluing it.

Don’t forget to type in your IPython Notebook:

import antigravity

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