Essential Python Packages

Almost three years ago, I wrote a blog entry titled Useful Python Packages, which listed the essential packages that I deemed important. How has the list been changed over the past three years?

First of all, three years ago, most people were still writing Python 2.7. But now there is a trend to switch to Python 3. I admitted that I still have not started the switch yet, but in the short term, I will have no choice and I will.

What are some of the essential packages?
Numerical Packages

  • numpy: numerical Python, containing most basic numerical routines such as matrix manipulation, linear algebra, random sampling, numerical integration etc. There is a built-in wrapper for Fortran as well. Actually, numpy is so important that some Linux system includes it with Python.
  • scipy: scientific Python, containing some functions useful for scientific computing, such as sparse matrices, numerical differential equations, advanced linear algebra, special functions etc.
  • networkx: package that handles various types of networks
  • PuLP: linear programming
  • cvxopt: convex optimization

Data Visualization

  • matplotlib: basic plotting.
  • ggplot2: the ggplot2 counterpart in Python for producing quality publication plots.

Data Manipulation

  • pandas: data manipulation, working with data frames in Python, and save/load of various formats such as CSV and Excel

Machine Learning

  • scikit-learn: machine-learning library in Python, containing classes and functions for supervised and unsupervised learning

Probabilistic Programming

  • PyMC: Metropolis-Hasting algorithm
  • Edward: deep probabilistic programing

Deep Learning Frameworks

  • TensorFlow: because of Google’s marketing effort, TensorFlow is now the industrial standard for building deep learning networks, with rich source of mathematical functions, esp. for neural network cells, with GPU capability
  • Keras: containing routines of high-level layers for deep learning neural networks, with TensorFlow, Theano, or CNTK as the backbone
  • PyTorch: a rivalry against TensorFlow

Natural Language Processing

  • nltk: natural language processing toolkit for Python, containing bag-of-words model, tokenizer, stemmers, chunker, lemmatizers, part-of-speech taggers etc.
  • gensim: a useful natural language processing package useful for topic modeling, word-embedding, latent semantic indexing etc., running in a fast fashion
  • shorttext: text mining package good for handling short sentences, that provide high-level routines for training neural network classifiers, or generating feature represented by topic models or autoencodings.
  • spacy: industrial standard for natural language processing common tools

GUI

I can probably list more, but I think I covered most of them. If you do not find something useful, it is probably time for you to write a brand new package.

Release of shorttext 0.3.3

On November 21, 2016, the Python package `shorttext’ was published. Until today, more than seven versions have been published. There have been a drastic architecture change, but the overall purpose is still the same, as summarized in the first introduction entry:

This package `shorttext‘ was designed to tackle all these problems… It contains the following features:

  • example data provided (including subject keywords and NIH RePORT);
  • text preprocessing;
  • pre-trained word-embedding support;
  • gensim topic models (LDA, LSI, Random Projections) and autoencoder;
  • topic model representation supported for supervised learning using scikit-learn;
  • cosine distance classification; and
  • neural network classification (including ConvNet, and C-LSTM).

And since the first version, there have been updates, as summarized in the documention (News):

Version 0.3.3 (Apr 19, 2017)

  • Deleted CNNEmbedVecClassifier.
  • Added script ShortTextWord2VecSimilarity.

Version 0.3.2 (Mar 28, 2017)

  • Bug fixed for gensim model I/O;
  • Console scripts update;
  • Neural networks up to Keras 2 standard (refer to this).

Version 0.3.1 (Mar 14, 2017)

  • Compact model I/O: all models are in single files;
  • Implementation of stacked generalization using logistic regression.

Version 0.2.1 (Feb 23, 2017)

  • Removal attempts of loading GloVe model, as it can be run using gensim script;
  • Confirmed compatibility of the package with tensorflow;
  • Use of spacy for tokenization, instead of nltk;
  • Use of stemming for Porter stemmer, instead of nltk;
  • Removal of nltk dependencies;
  • Simplifying the directory and module structures;
  • Module packages updated.

Although there are still additions that I would love to add, but it would not change the overall architecture. I may add some more supervised learning algorithms, but under the same network. The upcoming big additions will be generative models or seq2seq models, but I do not see them coming in the short term. I will add corpuses.

I may add tutorials if I have time.

I am thankful that there is probably some external collaboration with other Python packages. Some people have already made some useful contributions. It will be updated if more things are confirmed.

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Word Embedding Algorithms

Embedding has been hot in recent years partly due to the success of Word2Vec, (see demo in my previous entry) although the idea has been around in academia for more than a decade. The idea is to transform a vector of integers into continuous, or embedded, representations. Keras, a Python package that implements neural network models (including the ANN, RNN, CNN etc.) by wrapping Theano or TensorFlow, implemented it, as shown in the example below (which converts a vector of 200 features into a continuous vector of 10):

from keras.layers import Embedding
from keras.models import Sequential

# define and compile the embedding model
model = Sequential()
model.add(Embedding(200, 10, input_length=1))
model.compile('rmsprop', 'mse')  # optimizer: rmsprop; loss function: mean-squared error

We can then convert any features from 0 to 199 into vectors of 20, as shown below:

import numpy as np

model.predict(np.array([10, 90, 151]))

It outputs:

array([[[ 0.02915354,  0.03084954, -0.04160764, -0.01752155, -0.00056815,
         -0.02512387, -0.02073313, -0.01154278, -0.00389587, -0.04596512]],

       [[ 0.02981793, -0.02618774,  0.04137352, -0.04249889,  0.00456919,
          0.04393572,  0.04139435,  0.04415271,  0.02636364, -0.04997493]],

       [[ 0.00947296, -0.01643104, -0.03241419, -0.01145032,  0.03437041,
          0.00386361, -0.03124221, -0.03837727, -0.04804075, -0.01442516]]])

Of course, one must not omit a similar algorithm called GloVe, developed by the Stanford NLP group. Their codes have been wrapped in both Python (package called glove) and R (library called text2vec).

Besides Word2Vec, there are other word embedding algorithms that try to complement Word2Vec, although many of them are more computationally costly. Previously, I introduced LDA2Vec in my previous entry, an algorithm that combines the locality of words and their global distribution in the corpus. And in fact, word embedding algorithms with a similar ideas are also invented by other scientists, as I have introduced in another entry.

However, there are word embedding algorithms coming out. Since most English words carry more than a single sense, different senses of a word might be best represented by different embedded vectors. Incorporating word sense disambiguation, a method called sense2vec has been introduced by Trask, Michalak, and Liu. (arXiv:1511.06388). Matthew Honnibal wrote a nice blog entry demonstrating its use.

There are also other related work, such as wang2vec that is more sensitive to word orders.

Big Bang Theory (Season 2, Episode 5): Euclid Alternative

DMV staff: Application?
Sheldon: I’m actually more or a theorist.

Note: feature image taken from Big Bang Theory (CBS).

Continue reading “Word Embedding Algorithms”

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